Challenge of achieving zero CO2 emissions in the Toyota Boshoku group

Basic approach

In order to achieve carbon neutrality, we have formulated a new target of reducing CO2 emissions by 50% by 2030 (compared to FY2014).
We are promoting activities to meet the “Challenge of achieving zero CO2 emissions in Toyota Boshoku group” set out in our 2050 Environmental Vision formulated in 2016.
The Carbon Neutral Environment Division, which was newly established in April 2021, will further accelerate activities including the promotion of energy conservation and the use of green energy to achieve our goals.

2030 CO2 reduction scenario

In order to achieve the 2030 target that we formulated in fiscal 2019, we visited two bases in the Americas, Asia & Oceania, China, and Europe & Africa regions. During these visits, we promoted the creation of CO2 reduction scenarios while cooperating with local members to examine improvement items which can or should be implemented globally. Going forward, the entire Toyota Boshoku group will promote activities for reducing CO2 emissions.

1. Energy saving at plants: Example of energy conservation improvements using Karakuri

At the Gifu plant, we made improvements using Karakuri mechanisms to enable adjustment of the agitation speed of the paint tank’s air motor, thereby minimizing air consumption and reducing CO2 emissions by 2.45t-CO2 per annum.

Figure:Daily improvements at plants: Example of energy conservation improvements using Karakuri

2. Renewable energy [environmental performance]
Active introduction of renewable energy

The Toyota Boshoku group has systematically introduced renewable energy. In fiscal 2021, we continued to promote the introduction of solar power generation utilizing the PPA* system, and installed solar power generation in the MONOZUKURI Innovation Center at Toyota Boshoku’s Sanage Plant.
Moving forward, the entire Toyota Boshoku group will continue to systematically introduce renewable energy and respond to the need for carbon neutrality.

Installation results

  Before 2018 2019 2020
Japan Kariya Plant
Gifu Plant
Sanage Plant
ARACO
Toyota Boshoku Kyushu
TB Sewtech Kyushu
Toyota Boshoku Tohoku
TB Logistics Service
Takaoka Plant Sanage MONOZUKURI Innovation Center
Outside Japan Thailand
Toyota Boshoku Asia
Toyota Boshoku Gateway (Thailand)

China
Ningbo Toyota Boshoku
Toyota Boshoku (Tianjin)
Tianjin Toyota Boshoku

Thailand
Toyota Boshoku Automotive (Thailand)
S.K. Auto Interior
STB Textiles Industry
Toyota Boshoku Siam Metal

India
Toyota Boshoku Automotive India

 

  • Power Purchase Agreement : An electricity sales contract consummated between a power company and a power generator
Photo:Solar panels at the MONOZUKURI Innovation Center, Sanage Plant
Solar panels at the MONOZUKURI Innovation Center, Sanage Plant

The size of contribution in reducing the amount of CO2 emission through the introduction of renewable energy

Graph:The size of contribution in reducing the amount of CO2 emission through the introduction of renewable energy
  • We calculate the size of contribution in reducing the amount of CO2 emission by multiplying the PV power generation which we have introduced by the “CO2 conversion coefficient” of purchased electricity on the below.

Amount of CO2 emission

Calculation of greenhouse gas emissions

The CO2 conversion coefficients have been fixed so that voluntary improvements can be evaluated, as shown in the table below.
Additionally, greenhouse gas emissions reflect efforts to reduce CO2 through co-generation (calculated by multiplying the amount after deducting the CO2 emission factor for all power sources from the CO2 emission factor for thermal power generation by the amount of power generated through co-generation).

CO2 conversion coefficient

  Japan Regions outside Japan
Purchased electricity 0.37t-CO2/MWh
City gas 2.16t-CO2/thousand Nm3 2.08t-CO2/thousand Nm3
LPG 3.00t-CO2/t 2.83t-CO2/t
Kerosene 2.53t-CO2/kL 2.52t-CO2/kL
Heavy oil 2.70t-CO2/kL 2.94t-CO2/kL
Diesel oil 2.64t-CO2/kL 2.68t-CO2/kL

  • The power coefficient for regions outside Japan is calculated using country data from 2000 released by the International Energy Agency (IEA) in 2013.

[ Boundary of reporting ]

  • Toyota Boshoku: Global Mainstay Hub, plants and offices in Japan (17 plants)
  • Japan affiliates: Production entities (9 companies), others (6 companies)
  • The Americas region: Regional Management & Collaboration Hub (1 company), production sites (10 companies)
  • China region: Regional Management & Collaboration Hub (1 company), production sites (11 companies)
  • Asia & Oceania region: Regional Management & Collaboration Hub (1 company), production sites (11 companies)
  • Europe & Africa region: Regional Management & Collaboration Hub (1 company), production sites (8 companies)

Energy consumption and CO2 emissions (Scope 1 and 2) of the Toyota Boshoku group released on our website have been independently assured by KPMG AZSA Sustainability Co., Ltd. Please see the Independent Assurance Report for more detailed information.

Scope 3* (Supply Chain Management)

Toyota Boshoku has commenced to calculate the CO2 emission of whole Toyota Boshoku’s supply chain in order to reduce the CO2 emission from our whole business activities since FY2013.
Next, we will improve the precision of calculating method, and proceed to reduce CO2 emission after we evaluate the CO2 emission of each category in our whole business activities.

Figure:Scope 3 (Supply Chain Management)
  • Scope 3:CO2 in both Upstream and Downstream in business
    [Upstream] CO2 by supply of material, transportation and employees’ transfer
    [Downstream] CO2 by using and end-of-life treatment of sold products

Scope 3 emissions of Toyota Boshoku

(Unit : thousand t-CO2)

Sort Category Explanation of each category Calculation basis Emission
Upstream 1. Purchased Goods & Services CO2 by producing the purchased or supplied materials and parts Σ {(Price of purchased materials and products) × Emission intensity*1} 4,312 Assurance symbol
2. Capital goods CO2 generated in the construction and manufacture of the company’s own Capital goods (building & equipment, etc.) Σ {(Increased monetary amount of property, plant and equipment in report year) × (Emission intensity*1)} 158
3. Fuel & Energy-related Activities Not Included in SCOPE 1 or 2 CO2 by producing and transporting the purchased fuel & manufacturing stage of purchased electricity and heat Σ {(Fuel consumption amount) × (Emission intensity*2)} + Σ {(Electricity consumption amount) x (Emission intensity*1)} 11 Assurance symbol
4. Upstream Transportation & Distribution CO2 by transporting and distributing of receiving and shipping parts to Toyota Boshoku CO2 emissions amount associated with distribution by Toyota Boshoku 7
5. Waste Generated in Operations CO2 by disposing/dealing with the waste in operations (Except for valuables) Σ {Amount (by type of waste) × (Emission intensity by type of waste*1)} 3
6. Business Travel CO2 by Employees’ business travel Σ (Number of employees) × (Emission intensity per number of employees*1) 1
7. Employee Commuting CO2 by commuting of employees Σ {(Number of employees) × (Number of operating days) × (Emission intensity per number of employees and number of operating days by city classification by employment status*1)} 4
8. Upstream Leased Assets CO2 by operating the leased capitals in upstream Σ {(Area of offices rented by each office) × (Emission intensity per unit area by building usage*1)} 0.07
Down stream 9. Downstream Transportation & Distribution CO2 by transporting and distributing of receiving and shipping parts to OEM and consumers Toyota Boshoku has determined that our products are irrelevant because they have almost no impact on our customers’ CO2 emissions during shipping.
10. Processing of Sold Products CO2 by manufacturing the parts in delivery destination Toyota Boshoku has determined that our products are irrelevant because they have almost no impact on CO2 emissions during processing of the sold products.
11. Use of Sold Products CO2 by using the products of general consumers Toyota Boshoku has determined that our products are irrelevant because they have almost no impact on CO2 emissions during use of the sold products.
12. End-of-Life Treatment of Sold Products CO2 by end-of-life treatment of sold products Toyota Boshoku has determined that our products are irrelevant because they have almost no impact on CO2 emissions during disposal of the sold products.
13. Down stream Leased Assets CO2 by operating the leased capitals in downstream Toyota Boshoku does not have any applicable lease assets.
14. Franchises CO2 by Franchises Toyota Boshoku has does not have any plants or offices operated via a franchise agreement.
15. Investments CO2 related to management of investments Toyota Boshoku has does not operate an investment business.

  • By Ministry of the Environment, “The Emission per Unit Database for the Purpose of Calculating the Greenhouse Gas and Other Emissions of Organizations throughout the Supply Chain (Ver.3.1)”
  • By Advanced LCA Research Group, The National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST)and Japan Environment Management Association for Industry; LCA Database, IDEA version 2.3

CO2 emissions data that has been assured by an independent assurance provider is marked with this Assurance symbol assurance symbol (click here for details).

Reducing CO2 emissions in logistics

As part of our Logistic Session, we regularly convene logistics promotion meetings and through connection between plants and logistics companies work to reduce CO2 emissions in logistics and reduce pollution caused by vehicles used in distribution. In addition, the cross-organizational deployment of best practices from each plant aids in efforts to vitalize activities between plants.
Further, we continue to participate in Toyota Group logistics and environmental liaison meetings to share the latest information and information on best practices from other companies.

CO2 emissions in logistics* [Japan region]

Graph:CO2 emissions in logistics* [Japan region]
  • Toyota Boshoku shifted from the ton-kilometer method to a fuel economy method so that improvements are more accurately measured.