Safety

Our Basic Safety and Health Philosophy, and our Basic Safety and Health policy

Based on a Basic Safety and Health Policy, the Toyota Boshoku group implements safety and health activities as labor-management cooperative efforts in order to establish a corporate culture that places priority on safety and health at work. We also work globally to enhance safety and health at work through activities based on an Occupational Safety and Health Management System (OSHMS).
Furthermore, in order to absolutely prevent the occurrence of fires, we conveyed Toyota Boshoku’s stance on fire prevention and conducted management-led inspection in each area, held emergency preparation drills using fire extinguisher and fire hydrants for all members, and worked to raise awareness towards fire prevents.

Basic Philosophy for Safety and Health

Safe work
Reliable work
Skilled work
Safe Work is “the gate” to all work
Let us pass through this gate

Basic Safety and Health Policy

To foster a “Safety First” culture, we declare that we will not produce, handle, transport, or dispose of products or materials unless people’s safety & health, and the environment are protected. Additionally, we will conduct ourselves in line with the following basic principles.

Shuhei Toyoda

Policies for safety management

  • Don’t hesitate to stop producing
  • It is impossible to produce without the solution of the safety problem.
  • Accident has to be “Zero” even if it is non-absence accident.
  • Safety is at the basis of the workplace.

Safety and Health Promotion System

Figure:Safety and Health Promotion System

Safety and Health Activities Index

Accidents at Toyota Boshoku group over time

Graph:Accidents at Toyota Boshoku group over time

Frequency Rate (Lost time or above)

Graph:Frequency Rate (Lost time or above)

Promotion of Occupational Safety and Health Management System (OSHMS) Activities

Based on a Basic Safety and Health policy, in order to establish a corporate culture that places priority on safety and health at work, the Toyota Boshoku group is continuing labor-management consultations and cooperative efforts aimed at building a pleasant working environment that guarantees the safety and health of company members.
Due to the publishing of ISO 45001, and reforms to the Occupational Safety and Health Management System (OSHMS) enacted in July 2019, we amended the Toyota Boshoku Occupational Safety and Health Management System (Toyota Boshoku OSHMS) during the same year. Thanks to the Toyota Boshoku OSHMS, we are building a unified, more efficient Occupational Safety and Health Management System, and rolling it out globally.
We are making improvements to occupational safety and health on a continuous basis, with the aim of making issues relating to occupational safety and health easier to grasp, as well as reducing both economic and human resource costs.

Building a safe working environment

Using risk assessment (machines & equipment, chemical substances, work) to build an environment that is kind to workers.

As part of Toyota Boshoku’s Occupational Safety and Health Management System, we have introduced risk assessments for machines and equipment, chemical substances, and work operations, based on government guidelines regarding harmful or dangerous substances.
As a result, we are identifying possible sources of risk throughout the various steps of our manufacturing processes and taking measures to limit such risks to within acceptable limits, while enacting appropriate measures to manage any risks that remain.
Additionally, when installing new machines and equipment, company members with responsibility for production engineering, manufacturing, maintenance and safety make visits to the relevant manufacturers. We then perform checks based on the findings of previous risk assessments, while at all times carrying out uncompromising safety measures
These risk assessments are performed not only for the benefit of our company members, but also to address any possible risks that may be encountered by visiting customers or business partners.
Finally, we are also taking appropriate safety measures regarding conditions and quantity of all harmful chemical substances used in our production processes.

Photo:Performing a risk assessment, checking both work being carried out and the work procedures manual
Performing a risk assessment, checking both work being carried out and the work procedures manual

Safety Basic Behavior

In order to prevent occupational accidents, we believe it is important to foster good manners and morals among company members, and by doing so foster a culture where safety rules are followed instinctively.
As part of our efforts to do so, we continuously enforce the Toyota group-wide “Po-ke-te-na-shi” policy*, and are aiming to further raise awareness about safety through such means as in-person safety guidance activities and poster contests.
Additionally, we are distributing safety-promotion patches to be worn on company members’ persons, with the aim of spreading further awareness and understanding in the workplace.

  • Five basic safety guidelines to prevent accidents while walking, including keeping hands out of pockets, and avoiding using one’s phone while walking.
Photo:An outstanding entry in the “Po-ke-te-na-shi” competition for posters to raise awareness of safety displayed inside the Company
An outstanding entry in the “Po-ke-te-na-shi” competition for posters to raise awareness of safety displayed inside the Company
Photo:Safety awareness and guidance activities are periodically held within factories.
Safety awareness and guidance activities are periodically held within factories.

Safety Inspections

In fiscal 2022, the entire company worked together as one to confirm safe workplaces and behavior, with the aim of preventing STOP 6 accidents (six forms of accidents that can often be extremely serious) - especially accidents involving being caught or crushed within machinery and equipment using molds/dies.
Additionally, the CMO (Chief Manufacturing Officer)—head of the manufacturing division— performs safety checks on their own initiative in order to prevent accidents at kaizen areas, maintenance areas, and other such areas.

Photo:Safety inspection being performed by the CMO
Safety inspection being performed by the CMO

Fostering safety among company members

We believe education is vital for fostering safe behavior among company members.
In order to promote the development of human resources and workplaces in which fatal accident does not occur, the Toyota Boshoku group is systematically implementing relevant activities on a global scale, such as enhancing education for acquiring knowledge and skills, holding safety inspections, and conducting activities to entrench a culture of risk assessment.
Moreover, from FY2021, we established the Safety & Health and Environment fruitful Think and Act Center (SHE-TAC) within the MONOZUKURI Innovation Center with the aim of promoting the development of people who know the background and causes of past occupational accidents, consider countermeasures, take individual responsibility for matters of safety, and take initiative to implement preventive measures.
The Safety & Health and Environment fruitful Think and Act Center (SHE-TAC) fosters the development of safety and accident prevention-focused company members, carrying out training at various levels, including for newly-hired and newly-promoted company members.

Photo:An example of a past workplace accident
An example of a past workplace accident
Photo:Equipment used in lockout training
Equipment used in lockout training

Layout of the Safety & Health and Environment fruitful Think and Act Center (SHE-TAC)

Figure:Layout of the Safety & Health and Environment fruitful Think and Act Center (SHE-TAC)

Ensuring safety in outsourced construction

Toyota Boshoku conducts activities together with the Toyota Boshoku Safety and Health Association (including 47 companies) with the aim of ensuring safe construction management where there is no fatal accident on premises for anyone.

Figure:Organizational chart of Toyota Boshoku Safety and Health Association
Organizational chart of Toyota Boshoku Safety and Health Association

Information sharing in Toyota Boshoku Safety and Health Association

In order to improve safety, a total of 47 companies jointly operate the Toyota Boshoku Safety and Health Association. Information is shared, and concerns discussed at workshops held twice annually and large-scale safety events held before lengthy holiday periods, with the aim of sustaining joint awareness of the necessity of preventing any and all accidents.

Outsourced construction Patrol

Plant Safety & Health Administration, the Toyota Boshoku Safety and Health Association, and the Construction planning department work together, each taking their own role in outsourced construction patrol activities. Patrols don’t simply involve identifying unsafe behavior, but also listening to concerns, and creating an even better environment for construction workers.

Figure:Outsourced construction Patrol

System for Construction Observer Qualification

Outsourced construction is observed and managed for safety by holders of internal qualifications, each of whom has received specialist training.

Observer training (recalling and reflecting training)

Goal: to improve observers’ awareness of safety-related issues

Result: raising of danger awareness, identifying important issues for suppliers, cultivation of talented personnel capable of instilling caution

Examples:
  • Was the number of work supervisor appropriate?
  • Were the measures resulting from the risk assessments appropriate?
  • Do you know the appropriate way of using this protective equipment?

Safety Education Academy for Construction

The SEAC (Safety Education Academy for Construction) was launched in order to prevent accidents involving visitors and construction workers at our company sites. At the SEAC those in charge of construction work are offered the chance to handle equipment identical to those used in real worksites, and so get accustomed to the worksite environment. Participants who undergo this training develop a practical understanding of potential risks, and will be able to identify and perform kaizen on any issues or flaws they may encounter when actually visiting a worksite.

Photo:A representative image of SEAC training and equipment
Photo:A representative image of SEAC training and equipment
Photo:A representative image of SEAC training and equipment
A representative image of SEAC training and equipment

Introduction of Five-step Toolbox Meeting

We are introducing five-step toolbox meetings (TBM) with the aim of preventing accidents resulting from changes during construction or awkward-to-perform work.
Toolbox meetings consist of five meetings held throughout the day (after morning greetings, at 10am, after lunch, at 3pm, and after work has finished), which allows confirmation of the contents of work instructions, sources of potential danger, as well as changes to company members’ physical conditions and other similar issues.

Photo:Five-step TBM
Five-step TBM

Fire and disaster prevention initiatives

Past fires

At 2pm on April 29, 2018, a large-scale fire broke out at Tsutsumi Plant, causing a great deal of trouble and concern for the local community, our business partners and our shareholders. To ensure this kind of issue does not reoccur we hold the worldwide Toyota Boshoku Group Fire Prevention Day annually on April 29.

Photo:Past fires(1)
Photo:Past fires(2)

Fire safety inspections performed by top management

In response to the 2018 fire at Tsutsumi Plant, we have created heat source maps to identify any potential fire origin points for all our plants. Company presidents and chief plant general managers at all our plants, as well as at domestic affiliated companies, perform fire safety inspections on a continuous basis to check the handling and conditions of heat sources and other areas of potential danger.

Photo:A chief plant general manager checking the management situation
A chief plant general manager checking the management situation

Fire extinguisher training using VR

When performing fire extinguisher training, there is naturally a limit to the number of fire extinguishers that can be made available. However, by making use of VR during training, we are able to increase the number of people participating in this important training.

Photo:Fire extinguisher training using VR